EAST WEST PSYCHOTHERAPY & COUNSELLING - for East Devon, West Dorset & South Somerset - by Skype, FaceTime & Phone Worldwide

Useful books & Sites

Books can be useful in the process of personal development.

Here are a few which we have found to be useful:

Counselling for Sidmouth,Counselling for Lyme Regis, Counselling for Axminster, Couselling for Bridport, Counselling for Exeter, Counselling for Seaton, Counselling for East Devon, Counselling for West Dorset, Counselling for South Somerset. Counsellor for Axminster, Counsellofor Sidmouth, Counsellor for Lyme Regis, Counsellor for Bridport, Counsellor for Exeter, Counsellor for Seaton, Counsellor for East Devon, Counsellor for West Dorset, Counsellor for South Somerset. Psychotherapy for Axminster, Psychotherapy for Lyme Regis, Psychotherapy for Sidmouth, Psychotherapy for Bridport, Psychotherapy for Exeter, Psychotherapy for Seaton, Psychotherapy for East Devon, Psychotherapy for West Dorset, Pychotherapy for South Somerset. Psychotherapist for Sidmouth, Psychotherapist for Lyme Regis, Psychotherapist for Axminster, Psychotherapist for Bridport, Psychotherapist for Exeter, Psychotherapist for Seaton,Psychotherapist for East Devon, Psychotherapist for West Dorset, Psychotherapist for South Somerset. Supervision for Exeter, Supervision for Lyme Regis, Supervision for Sidmouth, Supervision for Bridport, Supervision for Axminster, Supervision for Seaton, Supervision for East Devon, Supervision for West Dorset, Supervision for South Somerset. Supervisor for Sidmouth, Supervisor for Lyme Regis, Supervisor for Axminster, Supervisor for Bridport, Supervisor for Exeter, Supervisor for Seaton, Supervisor for East Devon, Supervisor for West Dorset, Supervisor for South Somerset. Psychoanalyst for Sidmouth, Psychoanalyst for Lyme Regis, Psychoanalyst for Axminster, Psychoanalyst for Bridport, Psychoanalyst for Exeter, Psychoanalyst for Seaton, Psychoanalyst for East Devon, Psychoanalyst for West Dorset, Psychoanalyst for South Somerset. Psychoanalytic Psychotherapist for Sidmouth, Psychoanalytic Psychotherapist for Lyme Regis, Psychoanalytic Psychotherapist for Axminster Psychoanalytic Psychotherapist for Bridport, Psychoanalytic Psychotherapist for Exeter, Psychoanalytic Psychotherapist for East Devon, Psychoanalytic Psychotherapist for West Dorset, Psychoanalytic Psychotherapist for South Somerset. Psychoanalytic Therapist for Sidmouth, Psychoanalytic Therapist for Lyme Regis, Psychoanalytic Therapist for Axminster, Psychoanalytic Therapist for Bridport, Psychoanalytic Therapist for Exeter, Psychoanalytic Therapist for Seaton, Psychoanalytic Therapist for East Devon, Psychoanalytic Therapist for West Dorset, Psychoanalytic Therapist for South Somerset. Psychoanalysis for Sidmouth, Psychoanalysis for Lyme Regis, Psychoanalysis for Axminster, Psychoanalysis for Bridport, Psychoanalysis for Exeter, Psychoanalysis for Seaton, Psychoanalysis for East Devon, Psychoanalysis for West Dorset, Psychoanalysis for South Somerset. Psychoanalytic Therapy for Sidmouth, Psychoanalytic Therapy for Lyme Regis, Psychoanalytic Therapy for Axminster, Psychoanalytic Therapy for Bridport, Psychoanalytic Therapy for Exeter, Psychoanalytic Therapy for Seaton, Psychoanalytic Therapy for East Devon, Psychoanalytic Therapy for West Dorset, Psychoanalytic Therapy for South Somerset. Psychoanalytic Supervision for Sidmouth, Psychoanalytic Supervision for Lyme Regis, Psychoanalytic Supervision for Axminster, Psychoanalytic Supervision for Bridport, Psychoanalytic Supervision for Exeter. Psychoanalytic Supervision for Seaton, Psychoanalytic Supervision for East Devon, Psychoanalytic Supervision for West Dorset, Psychoanalytic Supervision for South Somerset. Psychoanalytic Supervisor for Sidmouth, Psychoanalytic Supervisor for Lyme Regis, Psychoanalytic Supervisor for Axminster, Psychoanalytic Supervisor for Bridport, Psychoanalytic Supervisor for Exeter, Psychoanalytic Supervisor for East Devon, Psychoanalytic Supervisor for Seaton, Psychoanalytic Supervisor for West Dorset, Psychoanalytic Supervisor for South Somerset. Counselling by Skype, Counsellor by Skype, Psychotherapy by Skype, Psychotherapist by Skype, Supervisor by Skype, Supervision by Skype. Psychoanalysis by Skype, Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy by Skype, Psychoanalytic Therapy by Skype, Psychodynamic Counselling by Skype, Psychoanalytic Supervision by Skype, Psychodynamic Supervision by Skype. 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Psychotherapist for depression, Psychotherapist for anxiety, Psychotherapist for stress, Psychotherapist for relationship issues, Psychotherapist for bereavement, Psychotherapist for past trauma, Psychotherapist for adoption issues, Psychotherapist for divorce issues, Psychotherapist for separation issues, Psychoanalyst for depression, Psychoanalyst for anxiety, Psychoanalyst for stress, Psychoanalyst for bereavement, Psychoanalyst for adoption issues, Psychoanalyst for relating issues, Psychoanalyst for divorce, Psychoanalyst for separation, Psychoanalyst for past trauma. Psychoanalytic psychotherapy for depression, Psychoanalytic psychotherapy for anxiety, Psychoanalytic psychotherapy for stress, Psychoanalytic psychotherapy for issues with relationships, Psychoanalytic psychotherapy for bereavement, Psychoanalytic psychotherapy for past trauma, Psychoanalytic psychotherapy for bereavement, Psychoanalytic psychotherapy for divorce,Psychoanalytic psychotherapy for adoption issues, Psychoanalytic psychotherapy for separation. Psychodynamic counselling for depression, Psychodynamic counselling for anxiety, Psychodynamic counselling for stress, Psychodynamic counselling for issues with relating, Psychodynamic counselling for divorce, Psychodynamic counselling for separation, Psychodynamic counselling for bereavement, Psychodynamic counselling for past trauma, Psychodynamic counselling for bereavement, Psychodynamic counselling for adoption issues. Skype counselling for depression, Skype counselling for anxiety, Skype counselling for stress, Skype counselling for issues with relating, Skype counselling for separation, Skype counselling for divorce, Skype counselling for adoption issues. Skype counselling for past trauma. Phone counselling for depression, Phone counselling for anxiety, Phone counselling for stress, Phone counselling for adoption issues, Phone counselling for separation, Phone counselling for divorce, Phone counselling for bereavement, Phone counselling for past trauma. Couple Counselling - by Skype, FaceTime, or PhoneMichael Friedrich provides couple counselling by Skype, FaceTime, or Phone worldwide, including: the UK, the USA, New Zealand, Canada, Australia, Hong Kong & Singapore.Couples typically have difficulties because most people find emotions hard to have and express and within the emotional intimacy of relationships there are often a lot of heightened and complicated feelings.Besides this, people often have relationship difficulties due to childhood experiences. For example, people who have experienced neglect or abandonment in childhood, understandably, may be hesitant about trusting another person in an intimate, committed relationship.Also a couple may be in difficulty because of an event - they may have had a miscarriage, job loss, affair, etc., which might have negatively impacted on the relationship.Couple counselling provides a safe space in which difficulties can be aired and new ways of relating can be experimented with. The sessions usually last for 75 minutes and there is usually one session a week and this usually lasts for as many sessions as the couple needs. The sessions cost £100.Useful books about relationships are:1. Families and How to Survive Them by John Cleese and Robin Skynner2. Our Need for Others and its Roots in Infancy by Josephine KleinMichael Friedrich MSc Psychoanalytic & Jungian Therapist Chartered PsychologistSeaton, Devon, EX12 2PWt. 01297 625006 m. 07989 000088ewpsychotherapy@gmail.comDr Monika Friedrich Clinical Psychologist EMDR Europe Accredited PractitionerSeaton, Devon, EX12 2PWt. 01297 625006 m. 07890 556339eastdevoncounselling@gmail.com Covid 19 Stress & TraumaWe provide Psychotherapy & Counselling to Address Stress & Trauma caused by Corona Virus. We do this by Skype, FaceTime & by Phone for anywhere in the world including: the UK, the USA, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, Singapore & Hong Kong.Currently a lot of people are experiencing stress & trauma due to issues around Corona Virus / Covid 19. This pandemic has , understandably lead to feelings of anxiety and depression. It is as though the sense of safety in the world has been temporarily removed. An associated feeling is of resources being inaccessible or in short supply and people are , at the moment, often more in touch with feelings of anxiety around death.We can offer a safe space to discuss these anxieties and we can provide practical stress management advice.Psychotherapy and counselling by Skype, FaceTime or phone has become increasingly popular due to social distancing and lock down, because of Corona Virus. But Skype & FaceTime therapy has been around for some time and we have been using it in our work for about ten years. People are attracted to it because they may be short of time or, perhaps there isn't a qualified, experienced psychotherapist or counsellor working nearby.We provide Jungian & Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy, Psychodynamic Counselling & Psychoanalytic Supervision, all by Skype, FaceTime or phone.The things which happen in an ordinary session, such as the client expressing feelings or the therapist trying to augment their understanding of the client, can happen equally well in person as by Skype, FaceTime or phone. In fact, if you look at pictures of Freud's consulting room, he had a chais longue with a chair along side of the high back the patient was resting their head on. Therefore the patient couldn't see Freud and he couldn't see them and so there was less visual contact than with Skype therapy.If you would like to discuss this further or explore the possibility of working with us by Skype, FaceTime or Phone, please feel free to text, email or phone us. Our contact details are below and these exploratory enquiries are entirely free of charge.Michael Friedrich MSc Psychoanalytic & Jungian Therapist Chartered PsychologistSeaton, Devon, EX12 2PWt. 01297 625006 m. 07989 000088ewpsychotherapy@gmail.com Dr Monika Friedrich Clinical PsychologistEMDR Europe Accredited PractitionerSeaton, Devon, EX12 2PWt. 01297 625006 m. 07890 556339eastdevoncounselling@gmail.com What is EMDR?Eye Movement Desensitisation and Reprocessing, EMDR, is a therapy used to help people come to terms with difficult things which have happened to them. EMDR can also help in reducing or eliminating some of the consequences of disturbing events – things like; flashbacks, upsetting thoughts or images, depression or anxiety.EMDR is recognised by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) and by the World Health Organisation (WHO) as a treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).Who can EMDR help?EMDR is often used to help with a variety of emotional problems such as; depression or anxiety, especially where a difficult life event has been the cause. EMDR can be used if someone has seen or experienced a traumatic or distressing event such as a car accident, a violent crime, sexual or emotional abuse, bullying, a social humiliation or the sudden loss of a loved one. EMDR can be used to help people to gradually heal from traumatic events and to recover.How does EMDR work?When a person is involved in a traumatising event, they tend to feel overwhelmed and their mind may find it very difficult to process what is going on. Memories of the traumatising event seem to become “blocked” and in this way the memories remain in the mind in a very intense and vivid form. This memory is often re-experienced, when it comes to mind, with the full force of the distress the person felt and with very vivid memories of what they saw, heard and smelt when they experienced the original trauma.EMDR aims to help a person to unblock and reprocess traumatic memories so that these memories can become more liveable with in the brain so that they are no longer so intense, disturbing and impactful. EMDR can also help people to become more desensitised to the emotional impact of the memory, so that they become more able to think about and talk about the traumatic event without being overwhelmed by strong feelings.How is this achieved?The EMDR psychotherapist achieves this by asking the person to remember the traumatic event whilst the person is simultaneously moving their eyes from side-to-side or listening to a sound in each ear alternately or feeling a tap on each hand or knee alternately. These side-to-side sensations appear to unfreeze the “stuck or blocked” processing structure in the mind, enabling the mind to reprocess the information so that it becomes more like an ordinary memory and feels much more liveable with.What is the theory behind EMDR?EMDR may work in a similar way to the process which naturally happens with REM (Rapid Eye Movement) sleep. This is when people are in deep sleep and are having a dream and their eyes typically move rapidly from side to side as the brain processes and mulls over the events of the day. Researchers have suggested that EMDR works by concentrating the mind on a task whilst the person is processing a difficult memory, and this gives the brain an overload of work. When the brain is not giving its full attention to processing the memory, it starts to become less impactful and less troubling. This helps the person to distance themselves from the memory and helps them to reprocess the memory so that it becomes calmer and more manageable.Michael Friedrich MSc Psychoanalytic & Jungian Therapist Chartered PsychologistSeaton, Devon, EX12 2PWt. 01297 625006 m. 07989 000088ewpsychotherapy@gmail.comDr Monika Friedrich Clinical PsychologistEMDR Europe Accredited PractitionerSeaton, Devon, EX12 2PWt. 01297 625006 m. 07890 556339eastdevoncounselling@gmail.com "The un-self-questioned life isn't worth living."Socrates11 Wessiters, Seaton, Devon, EX12 2PW, U.K.t. 01297 625006Michael Friedrich MScm. 07989 000088ewpsychotherapy@gmail.comDr Monika Friedrichm. 07890 556339eastdevoncounselling@gmail.comFeesOur fee for supervision and individual psychotherapy is £65 for a 50 minute session, £70 for a 60 minute session and £100 for a 90 minute session. The fee for couple therapy is £100 for a 75 minute session.We sometimes have spaces at a reduced fee for people on a low income.Fees are paid per session or at the end of the month by bank transfer, cheque, paypal or cash. The first assessment session is paid at the session.Session arrangementsSessions are at the same time every week. It is possible to have between 1 & 3 sessions per week, depending on the person's requirements.Missed SessionsIf you cannot make your session time, we can normally offer an alternative time. If you don't attend or cancel with less than 48 hours notice, we will charge the full fee.Michael Friedrich MSc Psychoanalytic & Jungian Therapist Chartered PsychologistSeaton, Devon, EX12 2PWt. 01297 625006 m. 07989 000088ewpsychotherapy@gmail.comDr Monika Friedrich Clinical PsychologistEMDR Europe Accredited PractitionerSeaton, Devon, EX12 2PWt. 01297 625006 m. 07890 556339eastdevoncounselling@gmail.com Handling Covid 19 StressThe Stress of Covid 19Lock down and social distancing can be detrimental to our emotional well-being because: It is an unusual state of affairs and, together with the general anxieties around potentially catching and dying from corona virus, it can seriously disturb us by removing or diminishing our normal sense of safety. This is comparable with the symptoms of PTSD, such as: hyper vigilance, high anxiety, nightmares, etc. Being restricted in social contact and everyday activities reduces our repertoire of stress management coping resources - we can't go to a particular shop or on holiday or swimming or to the gym. Our income could be adversely affected and our future income could be under threat. Living in closed groups can be detrimental to our relationships with the people we are closed in with - our partners, children, flat mates, etc. If we live alone, we can become lonely, because our normal social contacts will be reduced or eliminated. We may be apprehensive about the dangers of coming out of lock down and social distancing. If we are unable to work due to lock down or social distancing, in addition to potentially diminishing your income, it can diminish our self esteem and lead to depression. All these stressors can lead to further difficulties such as insomnia, anger and depression. If we or someone close to us catches corona virus, we are likely to be anxious about the outcome. If someone close to us dies from corona virus, we will endure a process of mourning.Handling Corona Virus StressAcceptanceWhen something terrible occurs, it is important to try to gradually accept the new reality if at all possible, rather than being in denial or somehow trying to push the new reality away. The saying, “It is what it is.†can be helpful here.Adjustment & AdaptationIt is usually useful to try to adjust & adapt to a new and stressful situation like the one which Corona virus is presenting. This means being open to new possibilities and being inventive in modifying your lifestyle.Fight & Flight Versus Processing Difficult FeelingsOur traditional response to stressors has been to engage in combat or run away. Both of these still have a place, but it is also useful to process difficult feelings and think about them. The mourning process is a good example of this. There are many losses associated with Corona virus - the loss of freedom of movement, the loss of a job, etc. If at all possible, it can be useful to stay with feelings such as sadness and anger associated with such losses, process these feelings and, if possible, eventually even learn something developmentally for our lives from the process of mourning.Stress Management Stress management is very important. There are several activities which can contribute towards managing stress. These include exercise classes such as yoga and pilates, which can be accessed over the internet. Relaxation techniques such as self hypnosis, meditation and visualisation can also facilitate stress management and help counteract insomnia. There are some relaxation resources here. Stress can also be diminished by engaging in amenable activities, such as hobbies, reading, listening to music or whatever suits you. Socialising over the phone or by Skype or email or text can also reduce stress.Maintaining a Healthy MentalityMental health is in many ways relative, but there are some areas which are generally helpful, such as: Keeping a sense of humour. It can be handy to cultivate a positive mental attitude and avoid excessive exposure to your own or other people's negative attitudes and stress. It's usually useful to try to be as honest with yourself and other people as possible and to increase reality testing and diminish denial. It's important to try to maintain self esteem Maintaining a healthy mentality is very challenging in the difficult environment which corona virus presents. Stress management and self care can be very helpful as can psychotherapy and counselling - which can be accessed during social distancing by phone, Skype, FaceTime, etc.Working on Your RelationshipThis can be achieved by: Honest discussion Taking time out from each other Couple counselling, which can be accessed during social distancing by phone, Skype, FaceTime, etc.Michael Friedrich MSc Psychoanalytic & Jungian Therapist Chartered PsychologistSeaton, Devon, EX12 2PWt. 01297 625006 m. 07989 000088ewpsychotherapy@gmail.comDr Monika Friedrich Clinical PsychologistEMDR Europe Accredited PractitionerSeaton, Devon, EX12 2PWt. 01297 625006 m. 07890 556339eastdevoncounselling@gmail.com The services we offer are: Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy, Jungian Therapy, Psychodynamic Counselling, Couple Counselling, EMDR, Stress Management & Supervision.We provide these services by Skype, FaceTime, & Phone worldwide, including: the UK, the USA, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, Singapore & Hong Kong. Currently, due to Coronavirus / Covid19, we are not providing an in person service from our consulting room in Seaton, Devon, UK.We offer help withRelationship issues Depression & sadness Anxiety & stress Couple counselling Emotional literacy Adoption issuesLoss & bereavement Past or recent trauma Emotional abuse Physical abuse Sexual abuse Separation & divorce Sexual problemsPornography addiction Low self esteemSelf awareness Life transitionsHighly sensitive people Ageing processesPsychotherapy and counselling by Skype, Zoom, FaceTime or phone has become increasingly popular. This could currently be due to people's concerns around Coronavirus, but it may be because you are short of time or, perhaps there isn't a qualified, experienced psychotherapist or counsellor working nearby.We provide Jungian & Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy, Psychodynamic Counselling, EMDR Therapy & Psychoanalytic Supervision, all by Skype, FaceTime or phone. If you would like psychotherapy by phone, we would prefer to see you by Skype, Zoom or FaceTime first for one or two sessions.Michael Friedrich MSc Psychoanalytic & Jungian Therapist Chartered Psychologist Seaton, Devon, EX12 2PWt. 01297 625006 m. 07989 000088ewpsychotherapy@gmail.comDr Monika Friedrich Clinical PsychologistEMDR Europe Accredited PractitionerSeaton, Devon, EX12 2PWt. 01297 625006 m. 07890 556339eastdevoncounselling@gmail.com "The unreflected life is not worth living."The process of gaining insight Irving Yalom The process of gaining insight isn't easy, because we tend to be frightened of our fears and ashamed of our embarrassments, leading us to unconsciously erect defences to hide our inner world from our own eyes. These defences enable us to pretend that we're not frightened, embarrassed, depressed, jealous or envious. This process of denying our feelings of guilt, cutting off from our anxiety and being out of touch with our depression is bad for our emotional well being. If we are blinded to our feelings and our internal world, we can't use our guilt to know that it's wrong to hurt someone or our anxiety to know that we are in danger or our sadness to know that we need to take time out to mourn for the death of a friend. Therefore it's handy to develop tools to help ourselves to break down these self imprisoning defences, these "mind forged manacles." (William Blake) By using these tools, we can get a better understanding of what's going on inside our heads and therefore make better decisions about our own lives and the lives of people around us.Dreams, for example, are a useful tool in this process of getting a truer picture of our internal world. They're the royal road to insight and every night we dream and so potentially it's a very available resource - even though we are often unaware of our dreams and therefore need to do some work to capture them and then we need to do some more work on them to understand their underlying meaning. Other tools which we can use for exploring our internal world are; creative writing, painting, sculpture, photography, singing, dancing, music and Jung's methodology of active imagination. In this work with artistic expression we are trying to bypass what Carl Jung called "the mad mind", i.e. the everyday chatter, defensiveness and rationality of our conscious mental processes, so that we can access and work with disavowed feelings, half aware preoccupations, and long forgotten trauma. Forms of artistic expression are suitable for this work, because they are consistent with the way the unconscious works - spontaneous, symbolic, irrational and poetic. The following are some methods which can be used when trying to work with the unconscious;1. Negative CapabilityThe poet, John Keats, in a letter to his brother, said that it is useful to have something which he called negative capability, "that is, when a man is capable of being in uncertainties, mysteries, doubts, without any irritable reaching after fact and reason." This mentality of allowing material to emerge from the unconscious and to openly listen to it is fundamentally important during processes of artistic creativity and it is also essential during the process of using art as a means of honest introspection and insight. If, in a top down kind of way, you are telling your unconscious what it needs to produce, there is no space for it to spontaneously present what is going on in the unconscious - what you are feeling, what your preoccupations are, what you are mulling over - all those things which erstwhile have been hidden will remain hidden, unless there is an open space for them to have a voice. Therefore, for example, in using painting as a means of self exploration, it is important to have the internal space and freedom to enable you to paint what your eye likes, not what you think someone else might admire. In creative writing, it is important to allow a story to spontaneously emerge from dreams and imagination, rather than from a logically imposed plot or story line. In sculpture, it is helpful to allow the wood to suggest a form it might take and with dance it is handy to move in a way which is free and expressive and to dance to music which allows you to do this.2. Reality TestingWhen a poet or artist is creating or reviewing their work, they are listening to the muse / unconscious and also to rational and more defensive processes. Some of this material is about yearning after truth, some of it is sometimes defensive, self deceitful, ego aggrandising self deceit. It's very important during processes of personal developmental introspection to try our best to reality test any material which emerges. For more about this topic, click the following link click here.3. Approaching an Understanding by Accessing the SubtextIn discussing dream interpretation, Freud distinguishes between the manifest and latent content of dreams. The manifest content of the dream is the surface story - the fierce captain of the ship is terrifying the little boy. The latent content is the underlying meaning - the subtext - the little boy part of the person feels intimidated by the violent father he had.There is a log trailed behind the ship. The manifest content is that this is a device to measure the distance the ship has sailed through the water in its voyage. The latent content is that the dreamer can use the log, i.e. the record or memory of what went on in order to process it. Also, the Greek word logos is about trying to discover and understand the meaning of things - to become reconciled to an irrevocable reality. Within Jungian therapy, the word logos is about the animus or the relationship with the male element which we all have, whether we're men or women. And so overall the dream is perhaps mulling over the area in relation to the dreamer's relationship with his father's aggression in relation to his own masculinity and masculine aggression - both in the conscious present, where it can be disavowed and projected into another person - the fierce captain - and in the unconscious, where it has perhaps been erstwhile buried in the detached, trailing stuff, way beneath the surface, but which now can be dredged up, owned and processed. The dream is therefore perhaps inviting the dreamer to remember, understand and process something about the feelings which he, as a little boy and now as an adult, has in relation to his father's cruel, fierce violence and also towards his own developing masculine assertiveness. It is therefore also perhaps saying something about how he can repair something within himself and allow himself to become a different kind of man and father to what his father was.This process of approaching an understanding of the subtext of the unconscious story is crucial in working with artistic introspection and insight - as exemplified by this dream work.4. Working Alone or With a TherapistIn the same way that being an artist is a democratic process - we are all poets & artists and we can all express symbolic stories emanating from the unconscious, we are also all capable of learning to understand the subtext of this material. However, in learning how to do these things, it can be handy to have the guidance of a therapist. The secret police often don't research their own crimes with honesty, integrity and insight and we tend to be remiss with the truth when working with our own defences, so an external person who has knowledge and experience with regard to these things can be handy.Michael Friedrich MSc Psychoanalytic & Jungian Therapist Chartered PsychologistSeaton, Devon, EX12 2PWt. 01297 625006 m. 07989 000088ewpsychotherapy@gmail.comDr Monika Friedrich Clinical PsychologistEMDR Europe Accredited PractitionerSeaton, Devon, EX12 2PWt. 01297 625006 m. 07890 556339eastdevoncounselling@gmail.com EAST WEST PSYCHOTHERAPY & COUNSELLING- for East Devon, West Dorset & South Somerset - by Skype, FaceTime & Phone WorldwideHome Michael Friedrich Dr. Monika Friedrich Contact & Fees MoreMichael Friedrich MSc Psychoanalytic & Jungian Therapist Chartered PsychologistSeaton, Devon, EX12 2PWt. 01297 625006 m. 07989 000088ewpsychotherapy@gmail.com About meI’m a Psychoanalytic & Jungian Psychotherapist and a Chartered Psychologist providing psychotherapy, counselling and supervision by Skype, FaceTime and phone. Due to the corona virus, I’m currently not providing therapy in person. I’ve been working as a therapist for more than 30 years and I’ve been a visiting professor teaching psychoanalysis at Masaryk University in the Czech Republic since 2009. I was working for 15 years in the NHS, where I had posts as a Chartered Psychologist, a Psychoanalytic Psychotherapist and as a Clinical Lead for Psychotherapy and Psychology services.Psychoanalytic & Jungian PsychotherapyI work using a combination of Jungian and Psychoanalytic theories. This combination is quite common in the UK and is a method of therapy which aims to increase self understanding and emotional literacy. It therefore helps clients to become less controlled by their past and thus become more honestly self aware and so make better decisions about their lives and to optimise their possibilities for self development.Couple CounsellingI provide counselling for couples, both straight and gay, who are experiencing trouble in their relationship. This sometimes results in people developing and salvaging a strained relationship and sometimes it results in people concluding that the relationship is not a good enough fit and that they would be better off separating.Stress ManagementThis is generally provided during the process of therapy and includes teaching stress management, relaxation techniques, mindfulness, meditation & visualisation. There is a page on Stress Management, Meditation & Visualisation on this website. SupervisionI also provide supervision for psychotherapists, counsellors, psychologists & psychiatrists - both students and fully qualified therapists and you are welcome to contact me to discuss this further. The way I work is roughly similar to that outlined in Patrick Casement's book "On Learning from the Patient" If you have any questions about how I work or how I can help, please get in touch.t. 01297 625006 m. 07989 000088ewpsychotherapy@gmail.comQualificationsNHS Certificate in Supervision – August 2006 Certificate in Supervision - British Association of Psychotherapists – July 2001 Psychoanalytic Psychotherapist – Guild of Psychotherapists – February 2000 Post M.Sc. in Counselling Psychology – City University - May 1996 M.Sc. in Counselling Psychology – City University - February 1994 Certificate in Psychodynamic Counselling – The Lincoln Institute - June 1989ExperienceCounsellor and Psychotherapist in Private Practice - since 1990 Visiting Professor in Psychotherapy at Masaryk University - since 2009 Chartered Psychologist, Psychoanalytic Psychotherapist and Clinical Lead of Psychology and Psychotherapy Services in the NHS up to 2009Organisational MembershipChartered Member of the British Psychology Society Member of the BACPMember of the UKCPMember of the Guild of PsychotherapistsAreas of counselling which I work with:Abortion Abuse Addiction(s)Affairs and betrayals AlcoholismAnger management Anorexia nervosaAntisocial personality disorder AnxietyAsperger's syndrome (ASD) Attachment disorder Avoidant personality disorder BereavementBinge-eating disorder Bipolar disorderBody dysmorphic disorder Borderline personality disorder Bulimia nervosaBullyingCareer counselling Carer supportDependent personality disorder DepressionDisabilities Dissociation Domestic violence Drug addiction Eating disorders Emotional abuse Family issues Feeling sad GamblingGender dysphoria Generalised anxiety disorder Hearing voicesHistrionic personality disorder HoardingInfertility Internet addictionLearning difficulties LonelinessLow self-confidence Low self-esteem MiscarriageNarcissistic personality disorder Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD)Obsessive-compulsive personality disorder Panic attacksParanoiaParanoid personality disorder Passive aggressive behaviour Personality disorders PhobiasPhysical abusePost-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) Postnatal depressionPregnancy and birth Redundancy Relationship problemsSchizoid personality disorder Schizotypal personality disorder Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) Self-harmSeparation and divorce Sex addictionSexual abuse Sexuality Smoking Spirituality StressSuicidal thoughts TraumaWork-related stress My Specialist AreasDepression, despair and mourning Artistic peopleRelationship issues Highly sensitive peopleChildhood emotional neglect Stress managementLow self esteemRight brain dominant people Dyslexic peopleIssues surrounding parenthood Parental concerns about a child Adoption issuesHighly successful peopleTherapies offeredArts therapies Couples counselling Jungian therapy Mindfulness PsychoanalysisPsychoanalytic therapy Psychodynamic therapyFees£65 for individual psychotherapy or supervision £100 for couple therapy I have a few reduced fee spaces for people on a low income.Michael Friedrich MSc Psychoanalytic & Jungian Therapist Chartered PsychologistSeaton, Devon, EX12 2PWt. 01297 625006 m. 07989 000088ewpsychotherapy@gmail.comDr Monika Friedrich Clinical PsychologistEMDR Europe Accredited PractitionerSeaton, Devon, EX12 2PWt. 01297 625006 m. 07890 556339eastdevoncounselling@gmail.com EAST WEST PSYCHOTHERAPY & COUNSELLING- for East Devon, West Dorset & South Somerset - by Skype, FaceTime & Phone WorldwideHome Michael Friedrich Dr. Monika Friedrich Contact & Fees MoreDr Monika Friedrich Clinical PsychologistEMDR Europe Accredited PractitionerSeaton, Devon, EX12 2PWt. 01297 625006 m. 07890 556339eastdevoncounselling@gmail.com About meI trained as a counsellor in 1995 and gained a Doctorate in Clinical Psychology in 2002. Whilst working in the NHS, I have undertaken additional training in Psychodynamic Psychotherapy, Mentalization Based Therapy (MBT), Eye Movement Desensitisation Reprocessing (EMDR) and in supervision. I've had a private practice for over 14 years and have been working from my consulting room in Seaton, East Devon, but currently, due to corona virus, I'm only working by Skype, Zoom and FaceTime. I also work in the NHS as a Psychotherapist and Principal Clinical Psychologist. I'm a Chartered member of the British Psychological Society, a member of the Health & Care Professions Council and I'm an accredited member of the EMDR UK Association.I provide the following services by Skype, Zoom or FaceTime worldwide.Psychodynamic Psychotherapy & CounsellingThis is a method of therapy which leads to greater self understanding and emotional literacy. It involves talking about the person's life both past and present and about dreams and other aspects of the person's unconscious.Clinical PsychologyThis includes providing psychological therapies and also teaching relaxation techniques, stress management, mindfulness and visualisation. My long experience as an NHS Chartered Psychologist helps me work with a wide range of severity and type of difficulties.Eye Movement Desensitisation and Reprocessing (EMDR)This is a comprehensive therapy which can help in the treatment of past or recent trauma and it can also help with a range of mental health difficulties. SupervisionI provide clinical supervision for psychotherapists, counsellors, psychologists and psychiatrists - both trainees and fully qualified therapists.Areas of counselling which I work with:Abortion Abuse Addiction(s)Affairs and betrayals AlcoholismAnger management AnxietyAsperger's syndrome (ASD) Attachment disorder Avoidant personality disorder BereavementBinge-eating disorder Bipolar disorderBody dysmorphic disorder Borderline personality disorder Bulimia nervosaBullyingCareer counselling Carer supportDependent personality disorder DepressionDisabilities Dissociation Domestic violence Eating disorders Emotional abuse Family issues Feeling sad GamblingGender dysphoria Generalised anxiety disorder Hearing voicesHistrionic personality disorder HoardingInfertility Internet addictionLearning difficulties LonelinessLow self-confidence Low self-esteem MiscarriageNarcissistic personality disorder Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD)Obsessive-compulsive personality disorder Panic attacks ParanoiaParanoid personality disorder Passive aggressive behaviour Personality disorders PhobiasPhysical abusePost-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) Postnatal depressionPregnancy and birth Redundancy Relationship problemsSchizoid personality disorder Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) Self-harmSeparation and divorce Sex addictionSexual abuse Sexuality Smoking Spirituality StressSuicidal thoughts TraumaWork-related stressFees£65 for individual psychotherapy or supervision - 50 minutes £100 for 1.5 hour EMDR sessions I have a few reduced fee spaces for people on a low income.Michael Friedrich MSc Psychoanalytic & Jungian Therapist Chartered PsychologistSeaton, Devon, EX12 2PWt. 01297 625006 m. 07989 000088ewpsychotherapy@gmail.comDr Monika Friedrich Clinical PsychologistEMDR Europe Accredited PractitionerSeaton, Devon, EX12 2PWt. 01297 625006 m. 07890 556339eastdevoncounselling@gmail.com Psychotherapy & Counselling for Men by Skype, FaceTime & PhoneAs men, we have had millions of years of genetic programming & a lifetime of our cultures telling us that we are a certain kind of entity - often that we are invulnerable & invincible, that nothing bad's going to happen to us and that those we love will never die. It's also easier to think that we're in complete control - we don't need anybody to love or to love us and, if someone is close to us, we're somehow in complete control of them. We tend to follow this male stereotype propaganda, because the converse is frightening - that we and those we love will certainly die, that we are vulnerable and needy and that we sometimes cry.ConsequencesAs a consequence of the mentality described above; -We tend to become less in touch with our feelings - finding it perhaps difficult to know if we are in danger or perhaps finding it difficult to appreciate moments of joy.We might have difficulty establishing loving, reciprocal relationships and so we could get to be quite lonely. We might even have a tendency to perpetrate acts of physical, sexual or emotional violence.We might develop costly defence strategies In order to stay in control of our inner and outer world - things like alcohol depedency.We'd certainly tend to be very reluctant to engage in psychotherapy, because it has an ethos exactly the opposite of machism.What are the alternatives?This masculine stereotype has advantages & disadvantages and has had a mixed press in recent years - mostly negative. But, what are the alternatives? It's quite difficult finding an emotionally intelligent masculine way of being. A man who is assertive can so easily be characterised as being, " a pushy male". A soft and gentle male easily gets labelled as a wimp and is sometimes bullied in the workplace or at school. This is one of the reasons why it can sometimes be more difficult for a man or a boy to be highly sensitive than it is for a woman. There is probably no easy way to be an emotionally intelligent man, especially if we've suffered some trauma in childhood.Perhaps it's best for each one of us to search amidst the male & female aspects of our inner world and gradually allow our own variety of male identity to emerge. I have a long and wide ranging experience of working with difficulties pertinent to men in my work in the NHS, privately and in the voluntary sector. I offer psychoanalytic psychotherapy from my consulting rooms in Exeter and in Seaton, Devon. I also work over the phone and with Skype for anywhere in the world.Michael FriedrichMichael Friedrich MSc Psychoanalytic & Jungian Therapist Chartered PsychologistSeaton, Devon, EX12 2PWt. 01297 625006 m. 07989 000088ewpsychotherapy@gmail.comDr Monika Friedrich Clinical PsychologistEMDR Europe Accredited PractitionerSeaton, Devon, EX12 2PWt. 01297 625006 m. 07890 556339eastdevoncounselling@gmail.com Psychotherapy & Counselling for Women by Skype, Zoom, FaceTime & PhoneExperience of abuse and violence against women has been widely evidenced by the current coverage in the press. As women, we can still experience covert and/or overt institutionalised sexism where some men seem to take advantage of their position to sexually exploit women and girls in this society. In some other societies women’s position seems even worse, for example, with female genital mutilation. Hopefully more public awareness will help to eradicate chauvinistic and cruel practices like this. Both historically and cross-culturally, women’s position has been disadvantaged, but it has been changing, albeit slowly. The main culprits of women’s oppression and of causes of injustice to women have been principally men, as supported by the official UK statistics. Approximately one in every five women has been sexually abused in childhood and most adult perpetrators have been men and most victims have been women. This all means that there are many women who are holding onto a lot of trauma and emotional difficulties and often they don’t come for help. I have frequently had clients in their 70s or 80s who had a life time of trauma and abuse and haven’t felt able to seek help from counselling in their younger years because of oppressive and alienating societal values. Women who have come to see me have often felt ashamed or embarrassed to engage in therapy and, as part of this, have felt that they should really get on with things - move on - have a stiff upper lip, etc., that they should not be having therapy.There has been a trans-generational pressure for women to keep quiet, but with the feminist movement in particular, women have been gradually finding their voice.In the UK women only obtained equal rights to vote in the early 20th century. Women are still receiving less pay for performing the same jobs as men. It has been reported in the press that older women tend to be more discriminated against in the workplace on the grounds of age than men of the same age (e.g. Olenka Frenkiel’s article, where she says, ‘The BBC: I saw guys my age thriving. Women were gone. I, too, was being rubbed out.’ in The Guardian on 8.11.14). Women working as house wives or mothers do not get paid or recognised for this and the government seems to be pushing them to go to work, thus devaluing the importance of motherhood and substituting this with child care, which is also underpaid and mostly carried out by women. Of course, there are also many women who choose to go back to work soon. Although parental rights have been granted by employers, in reality working women with children often face indirect discrimination by employers and might be considered as ‘problematic’ e.g. when a child gets ill. All of these and many other historical, social, economic and political pressures and conflicting views have led to potential emotional difficulties for women.Over the last decades, to be successful in the work place, women have had to adopt in large part a ‘male dominant ideology’ such as the stiff upper lip. To show sensitivity and to be more vulnerable is seen as being weak. This ‘male identification’ seems to be out of synch with many women’s natural tendencies, particularly if the person (actually, either a woman or a man) is very sensitive and this then potentially contributes to long term emotional difficulties.Having said all of this, clearly there are liberal men who support and understand women’s issues and indeed these men have been actively helping to improve the emotional well-being of both women and of men and of course, some women contribute towards the oppression of both women and men. Women and men both experience the same range and intensity of feelings and therapy can help us become more emotionally expressive and freer to make positive choices in our lives and thus improve our overall emotional and psychological well-being. I have a long and wide ranging experience of working with difficulties pertinent to women in my work in the NHS, privately and in the voluntary sector. I offer counselling/psychotherapy from my consulting room in Seaton, east Devon& over the phone and with Skype anywhere in the world - I accept payments through Paypal for foreign residents. I work with the following psychological and emotional difficulties:high levels of anxiety, panic attacks, obsessive and compulsive behaviours; chronic low mood, low self-esteem, lack of self-confidence;self-harming behaviours (including over-eating, under-eating, physical self-harm);not feeling able to leave a dysfunctional or violent relationship and experiencing intense fear and/or anger and rage;childhood trauma, including sexual, physical and emotional abuse and neglect; effects of bullying;adulthood trauma, including sexual exploitation, rape, domestic violence and emotional abuse within relationships;childbearing, pregnancy, terminations of pregnancy, pregnancy losses, choosing not to have children but feeling pressurised to have them;ageing, losses including loss of one’s physical health.Michael Friedrich MSc Psychoanalytic & Jungian Therapist Chartered PsychologistSeaton, Devon, EX12 2PWt. 01297 625006 m. 07989 000088ewpsychotherapy@gmail.comDr Monika Friedrich Clinical PsychologistEMDR Europe Accredited PractitionerSeaton, Devon, EX12 2PWt. 01297 625006 m. 07890 556339eastdevoncounselling@gmail.com Sadness & DepressionSadness, depression, bereavement, loss, divorce, separation, adoption & boarding school issues are all painful to experience and painful to mourn.All of us probably suffer from depression at some points in our lives.Psychotherapy, counselling & psychology provide methods of helping people to process sadness and move forward in their lives.Michael Friedrich MSc Psychoanalytic & Jungian Therapist Chartered PsychologistSeaton, Devon, EX12 2PWt. 01297 625006 m. 07989 000088ewpsychotherapy@gmail.comDr Monika Friedrich Clinical PsychologistEMDR Europe Accredited PractitionerSeaton, Devon, EX12 2PWt. 01297 625006 m. 07890 556339eastdevoncounselling@gmail.com Sensitive People & PsychotherapyCounselling & Psychotherapy can help highly sensitive people to take advantage of their huge talents, diminish their limitations and decrease their perception of the overwhelmingness of the world.Some people are born with a particular temperament which could be described as; sensitive, shy, timid, artistic or introspective.This temperament trait has its disadvantages, particularly for those of us living in a culture which values extroverts and an extroverted way of being. At home sensitive children can be irritable, have difficulty communicating their needs and feelings and have hesitation in being cuddly. At school they are often not understood or appreciated by teachers or fellow kids. They therefore are often open to being bullied and they often under achieve in exams, such as in GCSEs & A levels. This is often because they tend to get exam nerves. They also perhaps tend to have a higher than average incidence of various forms of dyslexia. When they leave school, they tend to be very wary of getting a relationship and career. With a relationship they often go for a reliable, coping person who will look after them, but may limit their capacity to be themselves. In work, their shyness often leads them to under perform. In older age they tend to be perhaps more fearful of doctors, medical tests and death.On the other hand, being sensitive has distinct advantages. Sensitive people tend to have a lot of intuition, inspiration, empathy and creativity. As kids they are charming and endearing. As adults, in an evolutionary sense, they have been the lookouts, shamans and court advisers. In more recent times, they have been the artists, therapists, poets, musicians and inventors. All of this is beneficial for society and rewarding for highly sensitive people.Psychotherapy, counselling & psychology can help highly sensitive people in several ways. Redefining sensitivity as being on the whole beneficial can be very liberating and empowering, if the person is limited in their lives by fear, we can teach them stress management and if they have been limited in finding out who they really are and what they really want, due to their temerity, we can provide them with a space to explore their inherent possibilities.E.M Forster - the novelist - said the following with reference to highly sensitive people. "I believe in democracy, though- if that is the right word, and if a democrat may use it. Not an aristocracy of power...but...of the sensitive, the considerate... It's members are to be found in all nations and classes, and all through the ages, and there is a secret understanding between them when they meet. They represent the true human tradition, the one permanent victory of our queer race over cruelty and chaos. Thousands of them perish in obscurity, a few are great names. They are sensitive for others as well as for themselves, they are considerate without being fussy, their pluck is not swankiness but the power to endure..."Counselling for the parents of sensitive children can also be useful.If you want to find out more on this topic, you can look at www.hsperson.com. You can do a rough test on there to check your level of sensitivity. Alternatively you could read the book, "The Highly Sensitive Person" by Elaine N Aron.Michael Friedrich MSc Psychoanalytic & Jungian Therapist Chartered PsychologistSeaton, Devon, EX12 2PWt. 01297 625006 m. 07989 000088ewpsychotherapy@gmail.comDr Monika Friedrich Clinical PsychologistEMDR Europe Accredited PractitionerSeaton, Devon, EX12 2PWt. 01297 625006 m. 07890 556339eastdevoncounselling@gmail.com Skype, FaceTime or Phone Psychoanalytic & Jungian PsychotherapyWe provide Psychoanalytic & Jungian Psychotherapy & Counselling by Skype, FaceTime & by Phone for anywhere in the world including: the UK, the USA, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, Singapore & Hong Kong. Due to Corona Virus / Covid 19 we do not currently provide psychotherapy & Counselling from our consulting room in East Devon, UK.Of course it may seem difficult working with a therapist you haven't met in person, but, currently, you may have concerns regarding coronavirus or you may be self isolating or there may not be an appropriately qualified and experienced Psychotherapist or Counsellor working locally or you may be pressed for time and welcome being able to access therapy from your home or workplace.Freud, in his practice, did not have visual contact with his client during the session, because the client was lying on a high backed chaise longue and Freud's chair facing away from the client. Freud felt that the client being relaxed and feeling un-intruded upon helped them become more in touch with their inner processes.We use Psychoanalytic, Jungian and Psychodynamic approaches in our work. However, because we have worked extensively in the NHS, we are pragmatic in our approach. We consider that the central task of the Counsellor or Psychotherapist is to provide a safe space, a facilitative environment or ventilated area to assist the client in approaching an understanding of who they authentically are.As part of this healing process, clients usually start therapy troubled by a specific difficulty such as: Relationship issues, Emotional difficulties related to: depression, sadness, anxiety, stress or emotional literacy, Adoption issues, Loss& bereavement, Trauma - past or recent, Abuse - emotionally, sexually or as the result of physical violence, Separation& divorce, Sexual problems, Pornography addiction, Low self esteem, Child of an alcoholic parent, Life transitions such as: the empty nest & retirement, Highly sensitive people and Processes of ageing. We can help you to address these issues using the Psychoanalytic, Jungian and Psychodynamic approach.Please feel free to call us to have a free preliminary discussion to explore whether we can provide a suitable service for your needs.Psychotherapy & counselling costs £55 for a 50 minute session and we accept payment by cash, Paypal, bank transfer and cheque.Michael Friedrich MSc Psychoanalytic & Jungian Therapist Chartered PsychologistSeaton, Devon, EX12 2PWt. 01297 625006 m. 07989 000088ewpsychotherapy@gmail.comDr Monika Friedrich Clinical PsychologistEMDR Europe Accredited PractitionerSeaton, Devon, EX12 2PWt. 01297 625006 m. 07890 556339eastdevoncounselling@gmail.com Skype, FaceTime, or Phone Psychoanalytic, Psychodynamic or Jungian SupervisionWe provide psychoanalytic and psychodynamic supervision for counsellors, psychotherapists and psychologists. We do this by Skype, Facetime or phone for therapists working anywhere in the world. Of course it can seem difficult working with a supervisor you haven't met, but sometimes there isn't an appropriately qualified and experienced supervisor working locally. And currently there are restrictions on face to face work due to corona virus.The theoretical model we use is psychoanalytic and psychodynamic and our preferred way of working is similar to that described in Patrick Casement's book, " On Learning from the Patient" - in other words, a modern British Object Relations approach, favouring the work of Winnicott and Bion. However, because we have worked extensively in the NHS, we are pragmatic in our approach. We consider that the central task of the supervisor is to provide a facilitative environment to assist the therapist in following the content of the client's material, both what is on the surface and what the underlying meanings might be. We also place a strong emphasis on keeping the therapist and patient safe. This means helping the therapist to maintain a manageable caseload and also helping them with risk assessment.Skype & phone supervision have huge geographical advantages. There may not be an experienced and well trained therapist working nearby. Also, people are often short of time and so it's better for them to do 50 minutes in their home or workplace than to travel 40 minutes there and 40 minutes back in addition to the 50 minutes. Another advantage of telephone supervision is that, for people with mobility problems, there's no need to go out of the home. Additionally, skype & phone supervision provides a reduced financial and ecological cost in that petrol or diesel is not being burned up on the journey. This Skype & phone supervision is for both individual therapists and for counselling and psychotherapy organisations.Please feel free to call us to have a free preliminary discussion to explore whether it might be a good enough fit. We are open to working with counsellors, psychotherapists and psychologists who haven't had a formal psychodynamic or psychoanalytic training.We have a sliding scale of lower fees for students or for therapists who are suffering financially due to corona virus. Supervision costs £65 for a 50 minute session and we accept payment by cash, Paypal, bank transfer and cheque.Michael Friedrich MSc Psychoanalytic & Jungian Therapist Chartered PsychologistSeaton, Devon, EX12 2PWt. 01297 625006 m. 07989 000088 ewpsychotherapy@gmail.comDr Monika Friedrich Clinical PsychologistEMDR Europe Accredited PractitionerSeaton, Devon, EX12 2PWt. 01297 625006 m. 07890 556339eastdevoncounselling@gmail.com Stress Anxiety & PhobiasWe all suffer from stress at times in our lives and it can hinder our capacity to live our lives to the full. This may mean, for example, that we get butterflies, under perform in exams, fear going to a business meeting, don't ask someone out on a date or have a panic attack.Psychotherapy, counselling & psychology provide ways of diminishing the impact of stress, anxiety & phobias on our lives.Michael Friedrich MSc Psychoanalytic & Jungian Therapist Chartered PsychologistSeaton, Devon, EX12 2PWt. 01297 625006 m. 07989 000088ewpsychotherapy@gmail.comDr Monika Friedrich Clinical PsychologistEMDR Europe Accredited PractitionerSeaton, Devon, EX12 2PWt. 01297 625006 m. 07890 556339eastdevoncounselling@gmail.com EAST WEST PSYCHOTHERAPY & COUNSELLING- for East Devon, West Dorset & South Somerset - by Skype, FaceTime & Phone WorldwideHome Michael Friedrich Dr. Monika Friedrich Contact & Fees MoreStress Management We have inherited built in stress management techniques from our parents, our great grand parents, going back even further to early human beings and to apes and lizards. These techniques typically involve fight and flight responses. If we are attacked by a lion or by a thief in our house at night, we typically respond by attacking or by running away.Modern stressors however, typically involve things like a bill or a bullying boss. We can be assertive with our boss or we can go to another room, but we can't bash them with a club and we generally can't go for a five mile run during the working day, so very often difficult feelings such as anxiety or anger may continue to bother us. Also, some people are born more highly sensitive than average. This was often advantageous for our ancestors - they were extra good at spotting predators - and it is advantageous now - empathy is useful for sales people and creativity is useful for artists. But being sensitive has the disadvantage that it can lead people to be extra apprehensive and stressed. People often develop counter productive ways of dealing with stress, such as; alcohol misuse, gambling, promiscuity and avoidance. Stress can also have a negative effect on our bodies, leading to irritable bowel syndrome, muscular skeletal tension, low immunity, etc.+How can we manage our stress better?We can modify our diet, cutting out or cutting down on sugars and caffeine, we can do exercise such as jogging or walking, we can do relaxation specific exercise such as yoga, we can have therapy. We can also use meditation and visualisation techniques to calm our minds. These techniques can be found in both eastern and western traditions, ranging from modern EMDR to ancient Buddhism and Yoga. Some of these meditation and visualisation techniques are outlined below.Progressive muscular relaxationEnsure that in two the hours prior to the relaxation you have not had any stimulating drinks such as tea and coffee or sweet drinks such as fruit juice. Place yourself in a comfortable position, preferably lying down. Make sure all your clothing is comfortable.Tense your feet whilst breathing in and then relax your feet whilst breathing out. Tense your legs whilst breathing in and then relax your legs whilst breathing out.Tense your stomach whilst breathing in and then relax your stomach whilst breathing out. Tense your hands and arms whilst breathing in and then relax your hands and arms whilst breathing out. Tense your shoulders and neck whilst breathing in and then relax your shoulders and neck breathing out.Tense your face and head whilst breathing in and then relax your face and head whilst breathing out. Tense your whole body whilst breathing in and then relax your whole body whilst breathing out.Alternate Nostril BreathingPlace one hand so that you can alternately cover your left and then your right nostril with your fingers and thumb. Breathe in for 5 seconds through your right nostril while the left one is covered by your thumb or fingers. Hold both nostrils for 10 seconds without breathing in or out, breathe out with your left nostril for 10 seconds. Breathe in through your left nostril for 5 seconds, then close both nostrils for 10 secondsand then breathe out through your right nostril for 10 seconds. Continue repeating this same cycle for 3 or 4 minutes.Eye FixationFix your eyes on a point above you or, if it's very dark, imagine a point above you and fix your eyes on it. Breathe in and breathe out slowly as you count the number one hundred.Breathe in and breathe out slowly as you count the number ninety-nine. Continue breathing in and counting down slowly until your eyelids close.This process of counting down until your eyelids close can be repeated two or three times.AnchoringClose your left hand.Imagine all the difficult, frightening and painful things in your life in the palm of your left hand.Open your left hand and imagine all these difficult, frightening and painful things flowing away like smoke through the window and over the horizon.Open your right hand. Imagine all the good things in your life in the palm of your right hand — any achievements, positive relationships, positive things about yourself or anything else good in your life.Close your right hand and imagine all these good and positive things going up your right arm and into the centre of your chest.Yoga NidraThis yogic practice is a process of visualising and powerfully concentrating on parts of the body. This tend to create a hypnotic effect - the Sanskrit word "nidra" means "sleep" in English Concentrate all your attention on the right hand thumb, the second finger, third finger, fourth finger fifth finger, palm of the right hand, back of the right hand, wrist, elbow, shoulder, waist, knee, ankle, big toe, second toe, third toe, fourth toe, fifth toe, left hand thumb, second finger, third finger, fourth finger, fifth finger, palm of the left hand, back of the left hand, wrist, elbow, shoulder, waist, knee, ankle, big toe, second toe, third toe, fourth toe, fifth toe. Now concentrate on the whole body. Combining these techniquesIt is possible to combine these techniques in order to increase their power. This can be done by starting with progressive muscular relaxation and then using all these techniques in the order set out here.Yoga Nidra SankalpaIt is possible to make a self suggestion - in Sanskrit, sankalpa - at the end of this sequence, after doing the yoga nidra exercise. This sankalpa needs to be formulated using three rules;Ask for attainable things, for example, "Little by little I'm getting better at handling stress." Don't use words like; must, will, ought to, should, have to.Don't use negative words such as, never, none, not.PrecautionDon't drive or use dangerous machinery after these meditation and visualisation exercisesMichael Friedrich MSc Psychoanalytic & Jungian Therapist Chartered PsychologistSeaton, Devon, EX12 2PWt. 01297 625006 m. 07989 000088ewpsychotherapy@gmail.comDr Monika Friedrich Useful books & SitesBooks can be useful in the process of personal development. Here are a few which we have found to be useful:The Highly Sensitive Person by Elaine N. Aron The Words to Say It by Marie CardenalOn Learning from the Patient by Patrick CasementOur Need for Others and its Roots in Infancy by Josephine Klein Families and How to Survive Them by John Cleese and Robin Skynner Asana, Pranayama, Mudra, Banda by Swami Satyananda Saraswati Concentration and Meditation by Christmas HumphreysThe Politics of Experience by R. D. Laing Memories, Dreams & Reflections by C.G. Jung The Complete I Ching by Alfred HuangMichael Friedrich MSc Psychoanalytic & Jungian Therapist Chartered PsychologistSeaton, Devon, EX12 2PWt. 01297 625006 m. 07989 000088ewpsychotherapy@gmail.comDr Monika Friedrich EAST WEST PSYCHOTHERAPY & COUNSELLING- for East Devon, West Dorset & South Somerset - by Skype, FaceTime & Phone WorldwideHome Michael Friedrich Dr. Monika Friedrich Contact & Fees MoreWe Provide Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy by Skype, Facetime & Phone Currently our work from our consulting room is suspended due to the Corona Virus. We are, however, still providing psychotherapy & counselling by Skype, FaceTime and phone.We work from our consulting rooms in Seaton, Devon, providing counselling, psychotherapy & supervision for the adjacent area, including; Exeter, Colyton, Sidmouth, Tiverton, Crewkerne, Yeovil, Honiton, Taunton, Crediton, Exmouth, Axminster, Chard, Lyme Regis, Charmouth, Ottery St Mary and Bridport.Michael Friedrich MSc Psychoanalytic & Jungian Therapist Chartered PsychologistSeaton, Devon, EX12 2PWt. 01297 625006 m. 07989 000088ewpsychotherapy@gmail.comDr Monika Friedrich We Provide Psychoanalytic Supervision by Skype, Facetime & PhoneDue to Coronavirus / Covid 19, we are not currently providing psychoanalytic & psychodynamic supervision in Seaton, Devon for places like: Sidmouth, Lyme Regis, Honiton, Axminster, Exeter, Bridport, Chard, Weymouth, Beaminster, Exmouth and Cullompton.We do however continue to provide supervision by Skype, FaceTime, VSee, Zoom and Phone.The theoretical model we use is psychoanalytic and psychodynamic. We both have had extensive experience of working in private practice and in the NHS. We tend to prefer a way of working not dissimilar to that described in Patrick Casement's book, " On Learning from the Patient" - in other words, a modern British Object Relations approach, favouring the work of Winnicott and Bion. However, because we have worked extensively in the NHS, we are pragmatic in our approach. We teach people stress reduction skills. We place a strong emphasis on keeping the therapist and patient safe. This means, for example, not having too many very disturbed people in your practice at any one time and conducting rigorous risk assessments. Please feel free to call us to have a free preliminary discussion to explore whether it might be a good enough fit.Michael Friedrich MSc Psychoanalytic & Jungian Therapist Chartered PsychologistSeaton, Devon, EX12 2PWt. 01297 625006 m. 07989 000088ewpsychotherapy@gmail.comDr Monika Friedrich